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An unused copy with a blank back.
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Postmarked October 11, 1898 with a Montreal Flag Cancel to Boston, Massachusetts, USA with a QV 1¢ Numeral stamp and a Boston, October 12 1898 back stamp, showing an ad on the envelope flap for patriotic envelopes produced by J.C. Wilson & Co.
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Song Back 1 illustrates the song “The Flag that Braved a Thousand Years”.
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Song Back 2 illustrates the song “It’s only a Bit of Bunting”.
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Song Back 3 illustrates the song “Red, White and Blue”.
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Song Back 3 illustrates the song “The Old Union Jack”.
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The attribution line on the reverse of one type of WLS-E02 Type II envelope contains the misspelling of “Soldier Boys” with the text “Soldiers Boys”
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A variety based on envelope size, with a small Envelope 148 mm x 87 mm, vs. the standard 163 mm x 92 mm size.
WLS-E02 Type II⏐Business Use
Some businesses chose to use J.C. Wilson’s patriotic postcards for their business correspondence. Below are examples using the WLS-E02 Type II design.
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This British Ensign Type II cover has been produced by J.C. Wilson & Co. to advertise their line of patriotic envelopes, and has the rear flap with printed text reading:

PATRIOTIC ENVELOPES
Anglo-Saxon … … … …$3.00
Rule Britannia … … … … per
British Ensign … … … … 1000
Old Glory … … … …

Across the face of the cover, a hand stamp has twice been diagonally applied, reading “Samples By J.C. Wilson & Co., Montreal”. It would appear this cover, addressed to T.T. Maloney, Carter Rice & Co., Boston, Mass., was intended to promote the purchase of patriotic envelopes. It was mailed at the 3rd Class Mail rate of 1¢ per 2 ounces reserved for, in this case, possibly advertising sheets, catalogues, prices current and commercial papers.

Postmarked October 11, 1898 with a Montreal Flag Cancel to Boston, Massachusetts, USA with a QV 1¢ Numeral stamp and a Boston, October 12 1898 back stamp.
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This British Ensign Type II cover appears to have been custom printed by JC. Wilson & Co., as the normal publisher’s attribution at the bottom of the back of the envelope has been omitted, and the lyrics of “The Flag that Braved a Thousand Years” have been printed lower on the envelope back than is the norm. Instead, the text “G.H. HARROWER - Montreal, Que.” has been printed at the top of the envelope back, with a centred horizontal line separating that text from the song title below.

It should be noted that it appears J.C. WIlson misprinted both copies of this custom printing, using an “S” instead of a “G” as the first initial, and printing the last name as “HARROW” with a comma following, which was then overprinted by an “ER”.
Above, postmarked May 11, 1900 Montreal to Halifax with a Halifax May 14 receiving postmark on the rear using a Small Queen 2¢ stamp no. 36. Rear of card showing song back no. 1. Below, a second example postmarked April 25, 1900 Montreal to Halifax with a partial receiving postmark on the rear using a QV Numeral 2¢ stamp no. 78
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Boer War Use

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This J.C. Wilson Maple Leaf For Ever Type I patriotic cover does not bear a postage stamp. On February 24, 1900, a Post Office Department circular was issued stating that letters sent from South Africa by Canadian troops on which postage was unpaid or insufficiently paid would be delivered to the addresses without collection of deficient postage.

Transiting through London England, the cover was initially marked “T” for postage due, but was corrected by scribbling out the “T” marking based on the Post Office Department circular.

For more on this cover, see this page.
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Other Interesting Uses

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This J.C. Wilson British Ensign Type II cover, thought to be unique, was postally used from Egypt to England on September 1, 1901. It is endorsed on the reverse “From 14858 Gnr W Stoneham, 16 Company E(astern) D(ivision) R(oyal) G(arrison) A(rtillery), Cairo, Egypt”. It is postmarked Abbassia, Caire, Egypt to Catford, Kent, England. It is franked with five copies of the 1m brown (Scott 43) and one copy of the 5m carmine rose (Scott 45), both issued in 1888. Below, the reverse of the cover.
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On June 1, 1899, the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) came into existence as a separate entity when existing coastal defence, mountain, siege and heavy batteries of the Royal Artillery were amalgamated. Britain had occupied Egypt since the 1882 Anglo-Egyptian War, which was motivated by protecting the interests of British bondholders with investments in Egypt as well as pursuit of domestic political popularity by the Liberal Party.

The Royal Garrison Artillery dispatched 16 Company of Eastern Division to Egypt to maintain heavy artillery there. The Army & Navy Gazette of the time reports the Royal Garrison Artillery was stationed in Egypt from at least 1897 through 1900 and beyond. The Royal Commission on the South African War reported in 1903 that companies of the Royal Garrison Artillery were dispatched to South Africa to serve during the Boer War.

It is possible that members of the RGA stationed in South Africa had supplied a copy of the J.C. Wilson envelope shown above to a comrade stationed in Egypt, from where it was mailed.
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This J.C. Wilson British Ensign Type II cover has been postally used from Lunenburg, Nova Scotia to Geo. McGibbons Esq., Records G.P.O., Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, a scarce destination. The cover bears a 5¢ QV Numeral stamp, cancelled with a Lunenburg cancellation dated May 23, 1900. The cover has a song back no. 17, with the patriotic song “The Old Union Jack”, unknown as a type to Gates, and designated here as E-6. The reverse of the cover shows a cancellation from Sydney dated June 24, 1900, just over a month in transit.
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This J.C. Wilson patriotic cover, British Ensign Type II design with a scarce Song Back 17, therefore variety E-6, was postally used December 3, 1901 from Montreal to Coldwater, Michigan, USA. It bears 7¢ in QV Numeral stamps comprised of a 1¢ and three 2¢ stamps for the postage and registration, paying single weight postage and the 5¢ registration fee.

Below, the reverse of the cover showing transit markings
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This J.C. Wilson patriotic cover, British Ensign Type II design with a plain back, therefore variety E-1, was postally used October 23, 1900 from Vancouver BC to Oswego, NY, USA. It bears 9¢ in QV Numeral stamps comprised of a pair of ½¢ stamps plus 1¢, 2¢, and 5¢ stamps for the postage and registration, paying double weight (4¢) postage and the 5¢ registration fee.

Below, the reverse of the cover showing transit markings
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This immaculate J.C. Wilson patriotic cover, British Ensign Type II design, variety E-5, with a Red, White & Blue song back no. 3, is postmarked August 13, 1900 with a very clean CDS cancel on a QV Leaf issue no. 73 10¢ stamp, is a very rare single use that is valued at $1,000 on cover in the 2008 Unitrade Specialized Catalogue.

Used locally within Port Maitland Nova Scotia August 13, 1900, for no apparent postal purpose.
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Above and below, British Ensign—Type II, variety E-6 with Song Back 17, “The Old Union Jack”, previously unknown to Henry Gates. This cover to England, postmarked December 29, 1898, with a Montreal Flag cancellation, represents an early use of a Map Stamp to England following the Canadian Post Office’s negotiations with Britain leading to the Imperial Penny Postage Scheme coming into effect on December 25th, 1898, allowing postage of 2¢ per ounce on mail between Britain & the colonies.
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An unusual use, from England to Ottawa, February 2, 1899, addressed to the Stamp Branch of the Post Office Department in Ottawa.